Tall Female Dancer, Edgar Degas
Edgar Degas
Tall Female Dancer
DE
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Edgar Degas

Tall Female Dancer, 1900 – 1910 (ca. 1919)


Dimensions
53.2 x 38.0 x 20.0 cm
Physical Description
Bronze
Inventory Number
SGP63
Acquisition
Acquired in 1926
Status
On display, Special Exhibitions

Texts

About the Work

After Degas's death his heirs found numerous statuettes in his studio, among the dust and all manner of tools which the artist had used to record the poses of dancers - presumably as studies. This figure is keeping her balance with one leg raised. Her stance is not a dance position but a training pose. Artistic interest in movement can also be seen in the play of light and shade on the restless surface of the posthumous bronze cast, which still shows traces of the wax modelling. The fact that Degas had never trained as a sculptor allowed him to take a freer, non-academic approach to sculpture.

Work Data

Basic Information

Title
Tall Female Dancer
Sculptor (male)
Period Produced
School
Object Type
Physical Description
Bronze
Material
Technique
Label at the Time of Manufacture
Degas; CIRE PERDUE A. A. HEBRARD; 23/O

Property and Acquisition

Institution
Administration
Collection
Creditline
Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main
Picture Copyright
© Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main, Foto: U. Edelmann
Acquisition
Acquired in 1926

Work Content

Motifs and References

Genre
Main Motif

Iconclass

Primary
  • 48C8422 female dancer
  • 31A262522(+89) standing on one leg, the other leg backwards held by hand(s) (+ nude human being)

Research and Discussion

Provenance

Object History
... Galerie Flechtheim und Kahnweiler, Frankfurt am Main
verkauft an die Städtische Galerie, Frankfurt am Main, Juli 1926.

Information

Since 2001, the Städel Museum has systematically been researching the provenance of all objects that were acquired during the National Socialist period, or that changed owners or could have changed owners during those years. The basis for this research is the “Washington Declaration”, also known as the “Washington Conference Principles”, formulated at the 1998 “Conference on Holocaust-Era Assets” and the subsequent “Joint Declaration”.

The provenance information is based on the sources researched at the time they were published digitally. However, this information can change at any time when new sources are discovered. Provenance research is therefore a continuous process and one that is updated at regular intervals.

Ideally, the provenance information documents an object’s origins from the time it was created until the date when it found its way into the collection. It contains the following details, provided they are known:

  • the type of acquisition and/or the way the object changed hands
  • the owner's name and place of residence
  • the date on which it changed hands

The successive ownership records are separated from each other by a semicolon.

Gaps in the record of a provenance are indicated by the placeholder “…”. Unsupported information is listed in square brackets.

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Last update

04.08.2020