Idealised Portrait of a Young Woman as Flora, Bartolomeo Veneto
Bartolomeo Veneto
Idealised Portrait of a Young Woman as Flora
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Bartolomeo Veneto

Idealised Portrait of a Young Woman as Flora, ca. 1520


Dimensions
43.7 x 34.7 x 0.9 cm
Physical Description
Mixed technique on poplar
Inventory Number
1077
Acquisition
Acquired in 1872
Status
On loan

Texts

About the Work

This work is traditionally considered a portrait of Lucrezia Borgia, the scandal-ridden daughter of Pope Alexander VI. In fact, it shows an unknown lady in the guise of Flora, the classical goddess of spring. Hence the bunch of flowers in her right hand, and especially the fanciful costume with the turban and wig. The exposed breast would have been unthinkable in a portrait of a respectable woman, married or not. Educated courtesans, however – who enjoyed particularly great popularity in Venice and Rome – often had themselves portrayed in the role of Flora.

Audio

  • Basic information
    01:21
  • Focus on art history
    02:06

Work Data

Basic Information

Title
Idealised Portrait of a Young Woman as Flora
Painter
Period Produced
School
Object Type
Physical Description
Mixed technique on poplar
Material
Technique

Property and Acquisition

Institution
Administration
Collection
Creditline
Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main
Picture Copyright
CC BY-SA 4.0 Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main
Acquisition
Acquired in 1872

Work Content

Motifs and References

Genre
Main Motif
Persons Shown
Associated Persons and Institutions

Iconclass

Primary
  • 61BB1 historical persons not known by name - BB - woman
  • 96A237 specific aspects, allegorical aspects of Flora; Flora as patroness
  • 41D132 fashionable woman, 'belle'
Secondary

Research and Discussion

Provenance

Object History
...
Friedrich Jakob Gsell (1812-1871), Wien
Nachlass Friedrich Jakob Gsell, 1871
Versteigerung durch Georg Plach an Louis Kohlbacher (für den Frankfurter Kunstverein), 14. März 1872 (Nr. 153)
Verkauf als "Florentiner Schule" an das Städelsche Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt am Main, 11. April 1872.

Information

Since 2001, the Städel Museum has systematically been researching the provenance of all objects that were acquired during the National Socialist period, or that changed owners or could have changed owners during those years. The basis for this research is the “Washington Declaration”, also known as the “Washington Conference Principles”, formulated at the 1998 “Conference on Holocaust-Era Assets” and the subsequent “Joint Declaration”.

The provenance information is based on the sources researched at the time they were published digitally. However, this information can change at any time when new sources are discovered. Provenance research is therefore a continuous process and one that is updated at regular intervals.

Ideally, the provenance information documents an object’s origins from the time it was created until the date when it found its way into the collection. It contains the following details, provided they are known:

  • the type of acquisition and/or the way the object changed hands
  • the owner's name and place of residence
  • the date on which it changed hands

The successive ownership records are separated from each other by a semicolon.

Gaps in the record of a provenance are indicated by the placeholder “…”. Unsupported information is listed in square brackets.

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Last update

13.01.2022