Blast 5416, Naoya Hatakeyama
Naoya Hatakeyama
Blast 5416
DE
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Naoya Hatakeyama

Blast 5416, 1998 (1999)


Blatt
100.0 x 150.0 cm
Physical Description
C-Print on dibond
Inventory Number
DZF 181
Acquisition
DZ BANK Art Collection at the Städel Museum
Status
Not on display

Texts

About the Work

An exploding landscape. The most famous blast in film history is the finale of Michelangelo Antonioni's "Zabriskie Point" (1970). In the eroded rock of Death Valley, where at the beginning of the 20th century the Pacific Coast Borax Company led by Christian Brevoort Zabriskie uncovered the crystalline mineral with their explosions, a mountain explodes silently to the sounds of Pink Floyd and mixes with the ruins of the villa on the summit. The allegorical road movie about Californian hippies has found its metaphorical equivalent in the motifs of Naoya Hatakeyama's S/ast series. The highly esteemed photographer in his Japanese homeland visualises the intermittent breath of the earth in moments of explosive discharge. A quarry in the north of the country is the scene of the last seconds in the life of the wounded, dying landscape falling out of nature. When Hatakeyama moved to Tokyo, he discovered the endangered, but voracious giant − the city − from the air and from the subterranean sewage system as an anonymous, populated desert − yet there is no life in it.

Work Data

Basic Information

Title
Blast 5416
Photographer
Serial Number / Edition
5 / 7
Period Produced
School
Object Type
Physical Description
C-Print on dibond
Material
Technique
Label at the Time of Manufacture
Bezeichnet: Rückseite unten mitte

Property and Acquisition

Institution
Administration
Collection
Creditline
DZ BANK Kunstsammlung im Städel Museum, Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main
Picture Copyright
© Naoya Hatekayama
Acquisition
DZ BANK Art Collection at the Städel Museum

Work Content

Motifs and References

Iconclass

Primary
  • 5 Abstract Ideas and Concepts
  • 58AA1 Destruction
  • 25D1 rock types
Secondary

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Last import

02.07.2020