After the Luncheon, Auguste Renoir
Auguste Renoir
After the Luncheon
DE
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Auguste Renoir

After the Luncheon, 1879


Dimensions
100.5 x 81.3 cm
Physical Description
Oil on canvas
Inventory Number
SG 176
Acquisition
Acquired in 1910
Status
Not on display

Texts

About the Work

In the arbour of a Parisian restaurant, an abundant meal is drawing to a close. The actress Ellen Andrée has taken the last sip of her after-dinner drink; lost in thought, she clings to its lingering taste. One of Renoir’s models is perched on the back of the bench and watches expectantly as the artist’s brother lights a cigarette with obvious satisfaction. There is a lull in the otherwise lively conversation. With great mastery, Renoir has captured the ephemeral impression on canvas in a seemingly spontaneous “snapshot”.

Audio

  • Basic information
    00:44
  • Focus on art history
    01:39
  • Focus on material
    01:41
  • Exhibition “RENOIR. ROCOCO REVIVAL” (2022)
    01:23

Work Data

Basic Information

Title
After the Luncheon
Painter
Period Produced
School
Object Type
Physical Description
Oil on canvas
Material
Technique
Label at the Time of Manufacture
Signiert und datiert unten links: Renoir 79.

Property and Acquisition

Institution
Administration
Collection
Creditline
Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main
Picture Copyright
Public Domain
Acquisition
Acquired in 1910

Work Content

Iconclass

Primary
Secondary

Podcasts

Research and Discussion

Provenance

Object History
Louis Flornoy (1825-1904), Nantes
Verkauf an Paul Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1899
Verkauf an die Stadt Frankfurt am Main, 1910.

Information

Since 2001, the Städel Museum has systematically been researching the provenance of all objects that were acquired during the National Socialist period, or that changed owners or could have changed owners during those years. The basis for this research is the “Washington Declaration”, also known as the “Washington Conference Principles”, formulated at the 1998 “Conference on Holocaust-Era Assets” and the subsequent “Joint Declaration”.

The provenance information is based on the sources researched at the time they were published digitally. However, this information can change at any time when new sources are discovered. Provenance research is therefore a continuous process and one that is updated at regular intervals.

Ideally, the provenance information documents an object’s origins from the time it was created until the date when it found its way into the collection. It contains the following details, provided they are known:

  • the type of acquisition and/or the way the object changed hands
  • the owner's name and place of residence
  • the date on which it changed hands

The successive ownership records are separated from each other by a semicolon.

Gaps in the record of a provenance are indicated by the placeholder “…”. Unsupported information is listed in square brackets.

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Conservation and Restoration

Art-technology findings and/or documentation regarding conservation and restoration are available for this work. If interested, please contact .

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Last update

21.09.2022