Four Lines Oblique Gyratory, George Rickey
George Rickey
Four Lines Oblique Gyratory
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George Rickey

Four Lines Oblique Gyratory, 1972


Dimensions
1128.0 x 1219.0 cm
Physical Description
Stainless steel, ball bearings
Inventory Number
St.P685
Acquisition
Erworben 2016 als Schenkung eines privaten Unterstützers. In besonderer Anerkennung der Leistungen von Max Hollein, Direktor des Städel Museums von 2006-2016.
Status
On display

Texts

About the Work

Gravity, equilibrium and moment of inertia, along with wind and weather, are the driving forces behind George Rickey's monumental sculptures made from industrially manufactured materials and reduced to geometric forms. Without touching each other, the four long, tapering arms of 'Four Lines Oblique Gyratory' also move freely in the space at differing speeds, depending on the air circulation. Both the special form and the material permit a fast and a slow rotation of the steel arms, each of which is longer than 4.5 metres. The shiny surface reflects the sunlight and further emphasises the moment when the static is dissolved, showing at the same time the rapidly changing lighting conditions.

Like the objects of his contemporaries Norbert Kricke and Heinz Mack, Rickey's sculptures are determined by a technoid aesthetic which nonetheless dissolves into a peaceful exchange with nature. Its central design media are not motorised devices, but space, movement and natural phenomena.

The engineer-artist Rickey, who worked for the U.S. Air Force for three years, focused in his objects primarily on the kinetic potential of material and construction based on the laws of nature. 'Four Lines Oblique Gyratory' can be seen as following in the tradition of Alexander Calder and of Suprematist Abstraction. As their successor, Rickey was concerned not with imitating nature, but with giving nature its 'room to manoeuvre'.

Work Data

Basic Information

Title
Four Lines Oblique Gyratory (Original Title)
Sculptor (male)
Period Produced
Object Type
Physical Description
Stainless steel, ball bearings
Material
Technique

Property and Acquisition

Institution
Administration
Collection
Picture Copyright
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019
Acquisition
Erworben 2016 als Schenkung eines privaten Unterstützers. In besonderer Anerkennung der Leistungen von Max Hollein, Direktor des Städel Museums von 2006-2016.

Work Content

Motifs and References

Genre
Main Motif
Associated Persons and Institutions

Iconclass

Primary
  • 0 Abstract, Non-representational Art
  • 49D32 line (~ planimetry, geometry)
  • 51L1 Motion
Secondary

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Last import

06.08.2019